Enabling strong Māori communities and environments

As an indigenous nation, who are we without our culture? For too long the cumulative intergenerational impacts of colonisation, land loss, cultural suppression, forced impoverishment and institutional racism, has negatively impacted the potential of Māori. In the past few decades we have had a cultural renaissance, and it is growing due to the strong foundational support of kōhanga reo, kura kaupapa and wānanga. Re-indigenising our world can only strengthen our unity and self-determination to succeed in economic prosperity and intergenerational wealth creation.

Kaitiakitanga as a core value and inherent of our deeper connection to Papatūānuku and her tamariki, is our imperative to better manage and care for our taiao which needs to be enabled through rangatiratanga.

Sr. No.Key actionsTimeframes
1Create intergenerational pathways to whānau prosperity1–3yrs
2Marae support and development1–3yrs
3Reflect Te Ao Māori in our places and spaces1–3yrs
4Enable more accessible te reo learning opportunities4–7yrs
5Increase use of mātauranga Māori as part of the solution to environmental challenges1–3yrs
6Better support and promotion of kaupapa Māori events across the region1–3yrs
7Establish a Māori Regional Ōhanga Āmiomio (circular economy forum)4-7yrs
8Enable kaitiakitanga – Māori participation in land use and development1 – 3yrs

Drivers and enablers: Te reo providers, marae, Te Puni Kōkiri, local government, NZ Māori Tourism, Wellington NZ, MBIE, MPI, regional Māori business networks, Ministry for the Environment, NZ Tech, Callaghan Innovation.

Key outcomes:
Connected to:
Measures of success:

There are clear pathways that are being utilised by whānau to achieve prosperity

Marae are receiving income to sustain ongoing maintenance and there is an increase in the use of marae across the region

The majority of traditional Māori place names are re-instated and more Māori design aspects are incorporated into the build of our towns and cities

All wanting to learn te reo are provided opportunity to do so, the number of Māori te reo teachers across the region are increasing and valued as such

Mātauranga Māori is underpinning our responses to key challenges – eg. climate change and other environmental projects

Kaupapa Māori events hosted across the region increase year on year

Mātauranga Māori is informing and guiding a shift towards a regional circular economy.

Māori are recognised and valued as kaitiaki of our natural resources.